News & Link Round Up: April 2011

April 25, 2011 by Categorized: Nature in the News.

Welcome to our first round up of links for nature & earth centred news, interest stories, blog posts, podcast episodes and much more!

 

A tornado ripped through the Lambert-Saint Louis International Airport in Missouri Friday night. The airport was mostly back to business this Sunday morning. The tornado also damaged many homes but oddly (and thankfully) caused no deaths or major injuries.

 

A new study shows that many children in England know very little about where their food comes from. Including thinking at pumpkins grow on trees and that cucumbers grow in the ground. Some are encouraging gardening to be taught at more schools.

 

The Great Elephant Poo Poo Paper Co. sells a unique product: Paper made of elephant poop. The owner of the company tells AOL news how his products are safe, sanitary and environmentally friendly.

 

The hole in the ozone layer is getting some news coverage lately. Researches have found that the hole in the ozone at the southern pole is having adverse effects on weather patterns in the southern hemisphere. Australia seems to be the most affected.

 

Plant life growing on planets orbiting red dwarf (dim) stars might grow black and grey foliage to help absorb more light.

 

Matt Walker, editor of BBC Nature Online wrote a wonderful blog post celebrating the humble mushroom.

 

A Coast Guard report has pointed the finger at poor training and lacklustre emergency preparedness contributed to the Gulf oil spill.

 

Professional chefs are creating ways to make their kitchens greener. Going beyond your typical recycling box, they are trying to reduce waster of all kinds, included wasted foodstuff.

 

The good people here at No Unsacred Place as well as at news sources all over the world have been following the debate over Mother Earth’s Rights.

 

Earth Day has come and gone. Wonderful coverage can be found over at the Wild Hunt Blog, Star Foster reminds us to love our Momma, Cam Mather encourages us to celebrate the day at home, and National Geographic posted 20 truly beautiful photographs in honour of the day. Discovery news also honoured Earth Day with photographs and stunning video.

 

On Earth Day New York state officials announced the purchase of Long Island’s pine barrens to be protected. This land will be preserved for naturalists, researchers and hikers. It is also a source of pure drinking water.

 

Science Daily brings us a story about how incense might be good for us. A team of researchers suggest this might mean a whole new class of medicine for depression and anxiety.

 

A disease that attacks wheat, called Wheat Rust, is causing some some serious concern. Wheat Rust has decimated harvest in parts of north Africa, the middles East, the Caucasus and Central Asia.

 

The podcast The Pagan Homesteader posted a special episode on dealing with our waste safely and sustainably.

 

The CBC considers the pros and cons of green power projects in Canada and the hurdles they will face in the future.

 

Hundreds of small islands seem to appear … and then disappear. Scientists are now beginning to map this very phenomenon; some 657 new barrier islands have been counted.

 

Wildfires continue to rage in Texas. There is hope that the right weather might assist firefighters combat the flames.

 

Britain’s beaches have been found to be dirtier than last year’s survey. This is largely due to folks flushing small garbage items down the toilet.

 

Did we miss something? If you have found a noteworthy article, news item or blog post please post the link in the comments section of this article.

Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

Comment Feed

One Response

  1. About the wheat rust news, the article cited said: “Country preparedness for outbreaks of wheat rust involves such issues as the availability of resistant varieties that are known to and accepted by farmers, the availability of sufficient quality seeds of new varieties for farmers to use, and the availability, accessibility and affordability of effective fungicides and capacity of farmers to use them.”

    When humans cover huge areas of the earth with a single type of plant, OF COURSE many insects, fungi, and other plants are going to evolve to eat that plant. The thing that scares me the most is that in response to this natural, inevitable situation, global agriculturalists will spray even more massive quantities of toxic fungicides all over the earth than they already do. Instead of working WITH the land and finding solutions by changing our relationship with food (and the earth that gives it to us), lets just poison the earth even more!

You must be logged in to post a comment.